Later on, that same evening …..

Hello again! And it’s still Friday the 13th, so more happy returns of the day to George MacKay, the remarkable star of the Not So True History of the Kelly Gang. I found both him and Orlando Schwerdt, who plays the young Ned Kelly, very watchable and believable. The performance of Essie Davies as the family matriarch Ellen is really powerful and a tad scary, shades of Lady Macbeth (interesting as director Justin Kurzel made his own telling of Macbeth in 2015); but Nicholas Hoult as Constable Fitzpatrick quite mesmerised me, such a charm and ease, and cold hardness (hmm, it just struck me that Hoult could make a rather good Flashman).

Sergeant O’Neil bugged me as I couldn’t quite place the actor; then I reckoned it was just that he’s like a cross between Tom Hardy and Heath Ledger; much later I realised I’d seen him just a few weeks ago in The Gentlemen, Charlie Hunnam, doh. It was lovely to see Thomasin McKenzie again (Elsa in Jojo Rabbit) and Russell Crowe (another born in Wellington like Thomasin) gave a rather good performance as the bushranger Henry Power (I have to admit I’m not particularly fond of the man).  Also, a mention for Earl Cave (indeed, son of Nick) as the feral Dan Kelly, he was really good; and, as I checked out as soon as I got home, a deadringer for a young Malcolm Young on the cover picture of Highway to Hell!

The Not So True History of the Kelly Gang is an atmospheric,  on-edge film, it gripped me from beginning to end. Visually it is brilliant, the cinematography is awesome, but then Australia is kinda awesome for a backdrop. One thing, it’s not so much about the Kelly Gang, more the personal (fictionalised, remember) history of Ned Kelly with the Gang thrown in as part of it; it’s Ned against his father, against Sgt O’Neil, Henry Power, Constable Fitzpatrick. For me there were shades of Peaky Blinders not only in style but that, like Thomas Shelby, Ned is driven by family loyalty and responsibility (and lost in it too?).

If one was to watch THotKG on such as Netflix, it would make a great double bill with The Proposition or Lawless. Or you could precede it with Captain Fantastic from 2016, in which George MacKay plays the eldest son to Viggo Mortensen, great performances from both. If you prefer horror, there’s The Secret of Marrowbone, another stellar performance from George, I caught this at the EIFF in 2018; horror as in suspense not gore, and an ending that may cause some sniffles.

I expect a great future for George MacKay, I’ll be watching.

Toodle pip!

 

A Post of Two Films

This week I finally got around to seeing 1917 and True History of the Kelly Gang at the cinema; it’s interesting how long some films will stay showing in multiplexes these days while others still disappear after only a short window space. Mind, burying a film in one early afternoon slot after just one week isn’t, to my mind, a good way to encourage more folk to see it.

1917 is an epic film and worthy of all the awards and accolades it has received. I’ll admit I didn’t see it earlier because I didn’t think it would be my thing, but as a few friends have raved about it having seen it, I thought I’d give it a bash. So glad I did, though glad possibly seems to some an odd word about seeing the horrors of trench warfare. It is an incredible but very sobering film of humanity in extreme circumstances. I found myself noticing the cloth puttees (cloth strips wrapped around from ankle to calf to give support) and remembered the moving Echoes of Villers-Bretonneux at last year’s Fringe.

As well as friends’ acclaim, I decided to go see 1917 because the cast includes some of my favourite actors, and one George MacKay, who has popped up on my radar the last few years.  (OMG, just noticed on IMDb on my phone – it’s his birthday today! Happy Birthday, George!) George is also the reason I  went to see True History of the Kelly Gang, as he plays Ned Kelly (that and my predilection to things antipodean). Personally, I seriously enjoyed THoftKG, the cinematography, cast, performances, the style and feral feel (akin I felt to Peaky Blinders), I say personally as there are many who hate it for many reasons, I mean, really hate it. Why? Well……

In the film Ned Kelly is beardless, this alone has upset a lot of people! Maybe if I was Australian I’d be quite protective of one of the most iconic Aussie images too, but maybe, it was, possibly even subconsciously, a very visual way to show that this is a fiction NOT a factual re-telling? The film is based on a novel of the same name by Aussie writer Peter Carey; the novel won the Booker Prize in 2001. See that word novel? It’s a fiction, a story. Crikey, if you want to complain about films that are historically inaccurate (yes, I know, me included), British historians have waaay more to be upset about!

Another element that greatly offended many was the “cross-dressing” outlaws. Erm, either those offended haven’t actually seen the film or weren’t paying attention when they did. It’s clearly said that they wear the dresses to freak out people and wrong foot them. One critic wondered where they’d get so many dresses, well, dur, they are thieves! The premise of acting crazy to appear more dangerous and unpredictable is very sound (let’s not forget Klinger in Mash). On top of that the “homo-erotic” moments were too much for some!

I can guess at some of those “moments” that offended, nowadays we’re all so tuned in for spotting the “offensive” even when we ourselves take none. The long-held stares between Ned Kelly and Constable Fitzpatrick (Nicholas Hoult) are quite a thing, but hey, two alpha males and all that; then there’s Ned and Joe’s (Sean Keenan) relationship, apparently too close for some, oh, get over it! Two people of any sex can be close emotionally and physically without it being sexual (and if more folk were capable of realising this it would save a lot of misunderstandings and broken hearts down the way), and again, this is a fiction, why would you care either way?!

In recent times Lord of the Rings Frodo’s and Sam’s relationship has been put under the same skewed microscope. These relationships are not to be viewed under 21st century lens, and isn’t it a shame that close platonic same-sex friendships can’t be perceived as just that? By now some may be jumping to the conclusion that I’m being homophobic, that I’m arguing against these guys being allowed to be gay (really, you must be olympian-standard long jumpers). Yes, you who want to be offended, nay, demand to be offended, and often on behalf of someone else who couldn’t give a rat’s arse.

Really, behave! To each his or her own, I say. And here endeth a slightly ranty post. Next up, more on THoftKG and the birthday boy.

Toodle pip!